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One developer, half a tester
Last Post 14 Aug 2014 03:32 AM by Olivier Ledru. 30 Replies.
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Mark Richman
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Mark Richman

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13 Aug 2014 12:26 PM
Our PO doesn't really understand what's required of her in the role. What's more, both she and I report to a manager who really acts more like the PO than anyone else.

I honestly don't know what the company values, as I work in relative isolation. I bet if they could have their way, they would do 1 week sprints and push everyone to work 60 hours a week. I've experienced that before.

I keep having items added to the product backlog, but even though they have not been groomed or commited to for any sprint, I'm told they are a priority, and as such I am to work on them first, in deference to what's been committed to in the sprint. Just because it's quick to code doesn't make it cheap.

Ian Mitchell
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Ian Mitchell

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13 Aug 2014 12:46 PM
I've had best results, in that sort of situation, by coaching "transparency first" with an elementary task or kanban board. This helps to establish the key building blocks of prioritization and queue management, limited WIP, metrics, and completing work to a known Definition of Done

I generally stick with that until I see where the pull for releases is coming from. I can then start coaching the value of cadence to incipient Product Owners. If this is valued, then I have a case for upping the game further and to start coaching Scrum.
Mark Richman
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Mark Richman

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13 Aug 2014 01:35 PM
I appreciate all of that. I think this organization wants to do scrum, but keeps getting caught up in deadlines. So from where I sit then mentality is, "do scrum as best you can, but remember we still have to ship all of it by the deadline".
Charles Bradley
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Charles Bradley

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13 Aug 2014 04:39 PM
Mark,

Based on everything you've said, your company is not doing Scrum, and has no interest in succeeding with real Scrum. It sounds like their culture is one of command and control waterfall, which has been shown to be 3X less likely to succeed(Schedule/Scope/Cost) than Agile. Until they realize that what they're doing is not working well, they likely will not change any of their behavior.

If they really *do* want help, then give them our web site and tell them to give us a call. :-) We help orgs like this all the time. I just sent you a LinkedIn request. :-)

http://ScrumCrazy.com
Ian Mitchell
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Ian Mitchell

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13 Aug 2014 11:35 PM
> I think this organization wants to do scrum, but keeps getting caught up in deadlines

Many organizations want the benefits of change, but without having to change. These are not the ones that succeed in an agile transformation. Wanting to "do" Scrum isn't enough, it is executive sponsorship that is needed.
Olivier Ledru
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Posts:219
Olivier Ledru

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14 Aug 2014 03:32 AM
it is executive sponsorship that is needed.

+1
Hey, Ian, have you been introduced to my top-managers ? ;-)
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