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Scrum Open vs. PSM I assessment
Last Post 01 Nov 2013 05:22 AM by Prabhu Missier. 5 Replies.
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Leonhartsberger
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Leonhartsberger

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24 Sep 2013 06:15 PM
    I tried to do the PSM I assessment today after studying 4 guides, reading the Agile Project Management WIth Scrum, attending a course, finishing the Scum Open a few times with 100%, doing some research and with some years of experience working on Dev Teams and with Scrum.

    Unfortunately I failed to pass with a 82% final score.

    I first realized that I could almost automatically reply questions that were similar on the Scrum Open, but I was surprised that if the Scrum Open difficulty is 2, then the exam has difficulty 5. It has nothing to do with it. While on the Scrum Open you have direct questions about selecting 2 possible answers, here you have a few questions asking to select whatever response you think it could be true.

    Also that if you take longer in some response, you won't have any time to come back to review your doubts at the end (only 45 seconds / question).

    What most concerns me, and I am wondering if I will repeat the exam, it's because I have to pay the tax again for this 3% without any discount :(

    I believe the exam with the multiple choices and random questions is just a question of luck.

    Do you think I should repeat it? How can I study harder? My time is getting limited and I don't think repeating the Scrum Open is a good thing, as the questions I get are always the same, only in diffrent random positions.

    Thanks
    Daniel Racowsky
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    Posts:57
    Daniel Racowsky

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    25 Sep 2013 08:20 AM
    Hi,

    Thank you for raising your concerns. Our Support team will contact you with more information.

    Sincerely,
    Daniel
    Atila
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    Atila

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    25 Oct 2013 01:17 PM
    I'm in the same situation. I tried to do the PSM I assessment after read the Scrum Guide several times, finishing the Scum Open several times with 100% and attending a course. I failed, for the 2nd time, both finished with 84%.
    I don't know where I can study anymore, because some situations of the test are not in Scrum Open, course or Scrum Guide. Where I can find these kind of information?

    Thanks.
    Wallace
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    Wallace

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    28 Oct 2013 08:09 AM
    Hi,

    I'm planning to do the PSM I assessment for the first time very soon and have similar worries, seeing that the open one isn't really exhaustive and there could be hidden pitfalls when trying to understand the Scrum Guide. I hope I can give some general advice about what I think is especially important when trying to answer (at first) unfamiliar questions:

    Basically, you should keep in mind the key principles the Scrum Guide is built upon and try to discover them in the given questions together with their potential answers. These are the points I identified as especially important:
    - The three pillars of empirical work (in the eyes of Scrum): transparency, inspection and adaption. Can you discover these principles in the potential answers of "what to do" questions?
    - The self organizing principle: you can get help from outside but nobody from outside tells you what to do. Can be applied to the Scrum Team or to the Development Team. (in the line of: Dev.Team has problems, what should the SM do? correct: help them sort them out themselves; wrong: alert management / solve it for them)
    - Scrum terminology: Sometimes possible answers seem ambiguous. When in doubt, use the one that uses the most fitting terminology e.g. "definition of done", "product increment". Such question are often stated as "what describes best..." or similar phrases.
    - The concept of "value" represented in the product backlog and in the work done (see terminology). Get suspicious when non-Scrum terms like "cost" are dropped.
    - When something can be done immediately, it should be done immediately (but only then). This is not stated explicitly but very important. It's part of the "inspection/adaption" pillars.

    A last point, it hasn't anything to do with Scrum, but I sometimes made the mistake of choosing the opposite answers than those that would be correct simply because I've got its meaning wrong. Losing points because of this is extremely irritating and unnecessary so take a bit of extra time to make sure you've answered as intended. Watch out for words like "not" or a number of correct answers in the question.

    Hope this helps and Good Luck!
    Wallace
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    Wallace

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    28 Oct 2013 08:21 AM
    Sorry, I want to make a correction/clarification to a point I made above: In a self-organizing team, of course you're working on requirements from "outside", the self-organizing aspect refers to how to do it, the specific actions to reach the goal.
    Prabhu Missier
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    Posts:26
    Prabhu Missier

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    01 Nov 2013 05:22 AM
    Experience helps to a certain extent. In my case I had worked on Scrum for more than 2 years so it became easy for me to attempt the test. But this is not always necessary.

    For total newbies to Scrum I would recommend going through the Scrum Master training before attempting the test. Also increase your knowledge of various Scrum concepts by reading articles and discussions on the forums on Scrum.org and other well known Scrum websites. Many of these discussions pertain to real life issues faced by engineers.
    Scrum.org also has several articles by Ken himself. You must most certainly cover all of Ken's videos and articles before the test.
    Besides this Mike Cohn who is one of the leading authorities on Scrum maintains a huge repository of Scrum info on his website.

    Depending on your level of Scrum knowledge your preparation time can vary between half a day and a month at the minimum.

    At the end of the day more knowledge and exposure is going to arm you better to face the battle at hand.

    To end on a philosophical note change your goal from passing the test to learning Scrum and you will most certainly reach greater heights.

    Good Luck!!
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