Forums

By posting on our forums you are agreeing to our Terms of Use.

Please note that the first and last name from your Scrum.org member profile will be displayed next to any topic or comment you post on the forums. If you have left the first and last name fields blank on your member profile, your email address will be displayed instead.

All user-submitted content on our Forums may be subject to deletion if it is found to be in violation of our Terms of Use. Scrum.org does not endorse user-submitted content or the content of links to any third-party websites.

Product Backlog vs Sprint Backlog
Last Post 18 Jan 2014 02:51 AM by Ian Mitchell. 5 Replies.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Sort:
PrevPrev NextNext
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
Nicolas Sanzana
New Member
New Member
Posts:15
Nicolas Sanzana

--
14 Jan 2014 03:34 AM
    Hi Guys,

    I know that Product Backlog should contains user stories and is managed by Product Owner, while that Sprint Backlog the responsible is the Team.

    1) This image is really a Product Backlog?

    http://epf.eclipse.org/wikis/scrum/Scrum/workproducts/resources/productbacklog.jpg

    2) This image is really a Sprint Backlog?

    https://www.scrum.org/portals/0/Images/Sprint-Backlog.png

    Thanks for your response

    Regards
    Martin Hinshelwood
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:18
    Martin Hinshelwood

    --
    14 Jan 2014 03:40 AM
    >>This image is really a Product Backlog? http://epf.eclipse.org/wikis/scrum/Scrum/workproducts/resources/productbacklog.jpg

    This looks like a reasonable example of a product backlog. I have no idea if it is a good well formed backlog however. I would need to see the detail that is on each of the PBI's. for that.

    >>This image is really a Sprint Backlog? https://www.scrum.org/portals/0/Images/Sprint-Backlog.png

    I would say no. It is a visual representation of the contents of a Sprint Backlog and not one itself. Think of the Sprint Backlog as those PBI's that you have agreed with the PO to attempt with a plan to complete them. So it is simply one or more PBI's broken down into a plan.

    The most common form of a Sprint backlog is a bunch of tasks under each PBI.

    Did that help?
    Ludwig Harsch
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Posts:272
    Ludwig  Harsch

    --
    14 Jan 2014 03:54 AM
    Hi nsanzana,


    1) This image is really a Product Backlog?

    http://epf.eclipse.org/wikis/scrum/Scrum/workproducts/resources/productbacklog.jpg



    There is no rule in SCRUM forbidding this to be a product backlog. It is ordered and estimated, so the team should be able to work with it.



    2) This image is really a Sprint Backlog?

    https://www.scrum.org/portals/0/Images/Sprint-Backlog.png



    This is a symbol picture of a sprint backlog. Of course a real sprint backlog needs content inside the rectangles: At least Descriptions and estimates for the PBIs and descriptions for the tasks.
    Best, Ludwig
    Ian Mitchell
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:1535
    Ian Mitchell

    --
    14 Jan 2014 10:35 AM
    >This image is really a Product Backlog?

    It would be...apart from the "By" attribute. This appears to show individual ownership of PBIs or their estimates. If either case is true, then that's not a Scrum Product Backlog. In Scrum the PBIs should be owned by the Product Owner, while the Development Team should be collectively responsible for estimates.

    > This image is really a Sprint Backlog?

    No. It looks like a schematic of a task board. The two states on the left (PBI and ToDo) may represent a valid Sprint Backlog if populating them is the output of Sprint Planning, and if they are regularly updated.


    Joshua Partogi
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Posts:109
    Joshua Partogi

    --
    15 Jan 2014 02:33 AM
    I like to oversimplify it to help those who are still new to Scrum as such :

    Product Backlog: list of things that needs to be done to make the product come into existence
    Sprint Backlog: list of things that needs to be done in the current Sprint, which includes selected Product Backlog items

    Ian Mitchell
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:1535
    Ian Mitchell

    --
    18 Jan 2014 02:51 AM
    Incidentally, a couple of years ago David Starr and Ryan Cromwell discussed exactly that taskboard image in the context of what should constitute a Sprint Backlog. You can read about it here:

    https://www.scrum.org/About/All-Articles/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/94/The-New-New-Sprint-Backlog




    You are not authorized to post a reply.


    Feedback