Thoughts on the Level I Certifications

Last post 11:33 pm August 3, 2018
by Ching-Pei Li
6 replies
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07:32 am August 2, 2018

Level I Certification is the first step to stepping into a Professional Scrum Assessments. If the SPS Certification is also considered as Level I(Difficulty: Intermediate), then there are 6 Level I Certifications, including:

  • PSM I
  • PSPO I
  • PSD I
  • PAL I
  • PSK I
  • SPS

 

Most people would choose PSM I as the first goal to achieve.

And then?

Below, I will provide some thoughts on these six certifications and some of my own practical experiences, providing references to people who want to validate their knowledge of scrum through the assessments. Any input would be appreciated.

For scrum.org members, Level I certifications can only be positioned in the formation of knowledge. It doesn't have to be too special to emphasize which certification is designed for which Scrum role. Instead, we should understand the subject areas of each certification.

Based on my experience in certification exams, I divided these six certifications into three categories:

Core Knowledge Formation: PSM I, PSPO I

Whether you are a Scrum Master or Product Owner, you should have the knowledge that is assessed by these two certifications.

 

Knowledge Scaling: SPS, PAL I

SPS: Extend your scrum knowledge to Scaled scrum of multiple teams.

PAL: Extend your Scrum knowledge to organizational levels and departmental leadership.

For medium and long term knowledge formation, it is recommended to scale both horizontally(SPS) as well as vertically(PAL).

 

Practical Technical Supplement: PSD I, PSK I

An agile consultant who understands the technical practices of agile can reduce many of the resistance to promoting scrum and gain respect. In the experiences of promoting Scrum, it is often impossible to convince organizations or people with development experiences without introducing or implementing some industry-validated practices.

As a Scrum coach, you may not need to know how TDD is going to work, but you'd better be able to read the relevant Metrics generated by TDD and how to use them. You may not need to know how the development team arranges and assigns their own work, but it's good for the whole team if you can read the Kanban related Metrics and offer advice to the development team.

 

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I am not a well trained scrum practitioner, the vast majority of knowledge is from my personal practices and experiences, so I constantly through reading and professional certification to verify the correctness of my knowledge, and constantly inspect and adapt.

I am happy to be here to learn from a lot of experts and thank scrum.org for giving me the opportunity to verify my knowledge. 

More importantly, my English is very bad. Many experts need to be very patient to understand what I mean to say. But they are willing to offer valuable advice. This is not seen in other forums.

Scrum On!!

09:09 am August 3, 2018

Hi Ching-Pei, 

Thanks for your post. Agree with you. 

01:29 pm August 3, 2018

I would disagree with putting PSK I and PSD I together - they are very different. I would place PSK I in its own category. - It's about enhancing Scrum, specifically with Kanban. I would also tend to not recommend PSD I. It only makes sense in the context of software development and even then falls outside of the scope of Scrum and what it recommends as practices (which I think tend to be good) aren't necessary to enact Scrum on a development team.

04:20 pm August 3, 2018

Fully agree with Thomas. You can read about TDD and other Developer centric tools and resources; there is no need or value for a SM or Agile Coach to get the PSD unless you're serving as a Developer. All Scrum knowledge is taken from PSM and PSPO anyway. Studying to pass a test that you have to pay for versus just reading about TDD and other tools is a much better ROI.

06:08 pm August 3, 2018

Hi Ching-Pei, 

Thanks for your post. Completed my PSM-1 last week. Will be targeting pspo-1 very soon and then SPS

06:34 pm August 3, 2018

You can read about TDD and other Developer centric tools and resources; there is no need or value for a SM or Agile Coach to get the PSD unless you're serving as a Developer.

A case can be made for attempting PSD before SPS, as the latter requires a mature understanding of development concerns such as integration and dependency resolution.

11:33 pm August 3, 2018

@Ian 

A case can be made for attempting PSD before SPS, as the latter requires a mature understanding of development concerns such as integration and dependency resolution.

Agree!

Another practical example that has recently occurred, I recommend that my clients use the Pair programming approach to add new people in order to expand into multiple Scrum teams.  

 

@Thomas

 It only makes sense in the context of software development and even then falls outside of the scope of Scrum

I don't quite understand the meaning of your sentence. Why do you think it falls outside of the scope of Scrum?

 https://www.scrum.org/about

Based on the principles of Scrum and the Agile Manifesto, Scrum.org provides comprehensive training, assessments and certifications to improve the profession of software delivery. 

 

 

@Curtis

Fully agree with Thomas.

I don't think  you are on the same page.

 You can read about TDD and other Developer centric tools and resources;

100% AGREE!