Decrease the popularity of PSM exam.

Last post 02:41 pm May 3, 2021
by Daniel Wilhite
5 replies
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05:49 pm May 2, 2021

I am very sorry for maybe a little bit unethical question from my side, but don't you think that PSM and PSPO certifications are not so valuable as in the past? 

I am asking because i am working i a big and we'll known company currently and, previously there was mandatory for Scrum Masters to have PSM or CSM certification, but now it is not required. The same situation in some other companies. So, don't you think that PSM certification are going to the past?

Very valuable feedback from scrum.org staffs

06:47 pm May 2, 2021

I dont like to make certificates mandatory for any hirings. But when I review resumes and see psm1 cert I understand that a person know how to work in Scrum. This is always multidimentional but this is always additional point. 

07:22 pm May 2, 2021

I have just run the following Google search which returned many jobs that mention the PSM qualification: 

psm I: jobs

02:20 am May 3, 2021

@Alfredo, I am not sure where your data is coming from, however the data that I see definitely differs.  That said, the PSM I or PSPO I certifications are only one piece of a complex puzzle and nobody should be hired solely for having a PSM or CSM.  It is just a sign that you understand Scrum or differentiator for you.

Also, I am seeing many companies using the assessments to do exactly that, assess where teams and individuals are and where they need to study and grow.  Using the assessments for PSM, PSPO, etc. as a guide for where they need more training or coaching, etc. to improve the team and individuals.

05:21 am May 3, 2021

I am asking because i am working i a big and we'll known company currently and, previously there was mandatory for Scrum Masters to have PSM or CSM certification, but now it is not required. The same situation in some other companies. So, don't you think that PSM certification are going to the past?

Perhaps there is a trend in those companies to try and control what Scrum means, so their "Scrum Masters" are less likely to present a challenge to the status quo.

Outcomes are likely to remain unchanged. There'll still be a need for change anchored in a more rigorous understanding.

02:41 pm May 3, 2021

In the times that I have been a hiring manager, I have neve hired someone because they have a certification.  I hire people that can show experience if I am looking for a upper level staff member. If I am searching for an entry level, I still want to hear them be able to provide some explanations for their answers.  Having a certification does not mean that either of those can be done.  

I have multiple certifications in Scrum from Scrum.org and ScrumAlliance.  None of them have ever gotten me a job. I get jobs by being able to listen to the questions that are being asked and then provide intelligent answers.  I have my certifications because I wanted to take the exams to prove to myself my level of understanding.  

I also agree with @Ian Mitchell.  Many companies use Scrum terminology but aren't doing Scrum.  What those companies want are people that will learn their Scrum-but.  Scrum-but is "We do Scrum but we do these things differently because ...".   Finding people that have project management experience or are well organized will usually suffice for the Scrum-but roles and have less difficulty "following the rules".