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Video
In this Scrum Tapas video, Professional Scrum Trainer Simon Reindl explores how to demonstrate the value of Scrum to your organization. (4:34 minutes)
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Video
In this Scrum Tapas video, Professional Scrum Trainer Simon Reindl discusses engaging middle and senior management with Scrum or Agile by emphasizing the importance of delivering tangible results in a short amount of time. (2:35 minutes)
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Blog Post
I was recently asked, "Do you think it's necessary to start every Sprint with each story fully specified?" The short answer: No, I don't. Join me as I discuss the topic.
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Blog Post
There are numerous benefits to a Definition of Done, but consider this: The entire purpose of Sprint is to deliver a done, usable increment at least once per Sprint. Shouldn’t we be clear about what done means to us in our context? In this article, we'll discuss 10 benefits of the Definition of D...
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Blog Post
What's the difference between Acceptance Criteria and Definition of Done? Teams that use Acceptance Criteria without a Definition of Done are skipping a crucial element of Professional Scrum!
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Blog Post
Dive into the Scrum framework's approach to ingrained quality through the Definition of Done.
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Blog Post
Applying the Definition of Done wrong will be detrimental to your agility.
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Blog Post
Enabling constraints are an often misunderstood but powerful tool when coping with complexity.
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Blog Post
Is Your Team Misinterpreting 'Done' in Scrum? Then Don't miss out on this video! Professional Scrum Trainers Robb Pieper, Greg Crown, and Jason Malmstadt dissect the Definition of Done and the "Done" Increment, shedding light on common misinterpretations.
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Blog Post
The DoD and the acceptance criteria are two fundamental concepts in product development. While DoD is part of Scrum, Acceptance Criteria is an additional practice.
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Blog Post
While only DoD is part of Scrum, some teams may choose to use DoR to help with Product Backlog transparency. The DoD provides a commitment for what the team must do to have a Done Increment.
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Blog Post
During this article, we’ll look at some basics about the Definition of Done (DoD). We’ll explore misunderstandings such as the application of the DoD, ways to use a fully achievable DoD and avoid creating a waterfall approach, when to inspect and adapt the DoD, and an example starting point for you...
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Blog Post
A short introduction about how you can make working with value more practical as a Product Owner.
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Book
By Simon Reindl and Stephanie Ockerman - This book is for anyone who wants to deliver increased value by using Scrum more effectively. Leading Scrum practitioners Stephanie Ockerman and Simon Reindl draw on years of Scrum training and coaching to help you return to first principles and apply Scrum w...
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Module
There are reasons why Scrum Teams may have un-done work at the end of the Sprint, but these occurrences should be infrequent as they are detrimental to the team’s ability to deliver value. There are various techniques that they can try to minimize having un-done work, including:Ensuring that everyon...
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Module
There are several reasons why Scrum Teams are left with un-done work at the end of the Sprint, including:They don’t understand the importance of time-boxes or Sprint Goals. If Sprints are just periodic check-ins on progress and if Sprint Planning merely involves updating an existing overall project...
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Module
The phrase “un-done work” refers to work that is not finished by the end of the Sprint, according to the Scrum Team’s Definition of Done. Un-done work is, simply put, waste. It adds no value to the product Increment and may even reduce its value. Ultimately, un-done work represents time that the Sc...
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Learning Series
Un-done work is work that does not conform to the Definition of Done and is therefore unfinished. It represents time the Scrum Team spent creating something that delivered no value. Learn what un-done work is, what causes it and techniques for eliminating it.
Blog Post
If you or your team are new to Scrum, you can use this as a starting point to answer, “what should we be doing and why?” for each Scrum Event. If your team is more experienced but you feel like you’re drifting away from healthy behaviors and patterns and you’re not sure how to course correct - you c...
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Blog Post
🚀 Navigating the nuances between the Definition of Done and Acceptance Criteria? 🤔 Dive into our latest article that explores the sanctity of a working, usable product without compromising value. 💡 Let's ensure quality and value go hand in hand! 🤝
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Blog Post
The Definition of Done and Acceptance Criteria both describe facets of a finished backlog item, don’t they? So what’s the difference? Does it matter? YES!! While they may seem similar, there are some crucial distinctions between these two, and confusing them may cause serious problems. I hope this q...
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Blog Post
How validating the value of the Scrum team’s work during the Sprint limits risk and increases predictability
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Blog Post
The three Scrum artifacts represent work or value. They help us maximize transparency, making it easier to inspect and adapt our way toward better outcomes. Let’s look at the commitment for each artifact to uncover their critical role in enabling the business benefits of agility.
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Blog Post
Back in 2012 when I was on the path to becoming a Scrum.org Professional Scrum Trainer, I travelled to Boston to attend a PSM course run by Ken Schwaber (the co-creator of Scrum and Chairman/Founder of Scrum.org). It was a large class and people had flown in from all over the world. Everyone was exc...
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Module
The “Definition of Done” (DoD) describes the quality standards for the Increment to be considered “done” and in a state that it can be effectively inspected. It provides to the Scrum Team and organization a common understanding of the completeness of the Increment. Without this crystal clarity, it’s...
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Video
In this video we discuss the Definition of Done, why it is important and give an example of how it is created. (4:29 Minutes)
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Blog Post
In this vlog, PST Joshua Partogi digs deep into the concept of Definition of Done and Increment in Scrum.
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Blog Post
The Definition of 'Done' probably is the most misunderstood concept of the Scrum framework. In this article, we will learn some common dysfunctions or antipatterns associated with the Definition of 'Done' and also certain tips or remedies to overcome these.
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Learning Series
The Definition of Done describes the quality standards for the Increment. Learn why getting to Done is so important, what undone work is, if it’s okay to show work that isn’t done to stakeholders, can you present undone work at the Sprint Review and what’s the difference between the DoD and Definition of Ready or acceptance criteria.
Blog Post
The Definition of 'Done' is probably the most misunderstood concept of the Scrum framework. In this article we will discuss:  What Is the Definition of 'Done'  How it can be used in Scrum Events
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Module
The Definition of Done creates transparency by providing everyone a shared understanding of what work was completed and what standards were met as part of the Increment. If a Product Backlog Item does not meet the Definition of Done, it cannot be released yet. Think of the Definition of Done as the ...
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Blog Post
Business agility is only possible with technical excellence. Learn more about the twelve success principles of employing a Definition of Done as a quality standard to support your organization’s path to agility.
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Blog Post
A scenario showing how the scrum framework and metrics can help a team self manage for improvement.
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Blog Post
10 simple principles of a critical scrum success factor to improve your team’s effectiveness, team spirit, and reputation.
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Blog Post
According to the Scrum Guide, Scrum teams are typically 10 or fewer, with a preference to the smaller size.  When Scrum Teams become too large, they should consider re-organizing into multiple Scrum teams supporting a single product.  When this happens, the Scrum Teams should share a single Product ...
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Blog Post
But when you have scrum, for example, you need to deliver an increment every single sprint and that increment needs to be done. So the team needs to have a thing called a Definition of Done and done does not mean met the acceptance criteria. Doesn’t just mean that, there should be other consideratio...
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Blog Post
What is an Increment and how does it connect with the other elements of Scrum?
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Blog Post
In this blog post we will give examples of Increments and why it is important to have Done Increments
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Blog Post
3 Do-it-yourself workshops to create, use, and improve your Definition of Done
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Blog Post
Forget all these Agile Maturity Scans which are often treated as management reports and too focussed on the mechanical side of "do these things and the maturity goes up". Change itself should be considered an empirical journey with no end state. It’s always on the move, so start with making your tra...
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Blog Post
Scrum uses an iterative, incremental approach to deliver value to the business through the medium of the Sprint. The purpose of each Sprint is to deliver a Done, usable increment. It sounds straightforward, but it can be tricky to achieve. Here are the three steps to Done in Scrum.
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Blog Post
A common question we get asked is how do we get started with creating a Definition of Done? Let's explore how we can obtain transparency of where you are, your destination should be, and what your possible first steps are to get there!
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Blog Post
Even a well-set team with clear objectives may fail to finish each thing when the Sprint ends.
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Webcast
There is a lot going on when it comes to delivering complex products in an uncertain and constantly changing world. In this webinar, Scrum.org Professional Scrum Trainer Stephanie Ockerman breaks it down to 5 ways Scrum Teams can discover their opportunities to improve the many different aspects of ...
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Blog Post
Leaders use the Scrum Artifacts as a window into the work of the Scrum Team. This transparency enables inspection and adaptation at the appropriate level while enabling the team to self-manage. 
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Blog Post
In today's vlog I would like to come back to the fundamentals of Scrum ... Done Increment.
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Blog Post
If I were to summarize the purpose of a Sprint, I would say that it’s to deliver a Done, usable increment that meets the Sprint Goal.
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Blog Post
This blog post discusses how the Circles of Improvement from the book by Stephen R. Covey: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, work in Scrum.
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Blog Post
In my live training, I often ask students why we estimate. The answer I usually hear is some version of...“So we know how big something is and how long it will take.”  
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Blog Post
Join me and explore the reasons and the consequences of this Sprint anti-pattern in 109 seconds.
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