Forums

By posting to our forums you are agreeing to the Forum terms of use.
PSM I - Few clarifications required
Last Post 16 Dec 2013 10:08 AM by Leonhartsberger. 10 Replies.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Sort:
PrevPrev NextNext
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages Informative
Senthil
New Member
New Member
Posts:7
Senthil

--
04 Sep 2013 02:04 PM
    Hi,

    Can you please help me finding answers for the below questions?

    1) What is a Trendline on a Release Burndown chart indicate? How does it help the Scrum team?

    2) Can the Development team decide or recommend the Scrum master not to have the Sprint Retrospective meeting to be held, when they feel there is nothing that can be discussed?

    I understand that the other Scrum events like Sprint Planning, Daily Scrum and Sprint Review meetings can't be skipped as their purpose seems critical in a Sprint.

    3) What are the responsibilities of a tester in a Development team?

    4) Should a properly functioning scrum team have at least one Release in a Sprint?

    5) Is the Product owner responsible for maintaining the Product burndown chart? I understand the Development team owns the Sprint backlog and the Sprint burndown chart as well. Kindly explain.

    Thanks!
    Senthil
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:7
    Senthil

    --
    04 Sep 2013 02:13 PM
    Adding one more question that i forgot to ask earlier...

    7) On a Daily Scrum, why does the Development team discuss on what they will be doing for the next 24 hours while they might work only for next 8-10 hours of the day and also they meet daily. I feel this might be a dumb question (When the Scrum team has people from different time zones and geographies) But apt explanation would be helpful for better understanding.
    Ian Mitchell
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Posts:562
    Ian Mitchell

    --
    04 Sep 2013 02:49 PM
    1. A trendline is used in two contexts. It can mean the line representing ideal burn, and the team can see how closely their burn rate matches. Alternatively it can mean a line projected from the current burn rate, and which shows the likely time of completion.

    2. No. There is always something to be discussed. An agile team must never fail to inspect and adapt their way of working.

    3. There is no Tester role in Scrum, and therefore no associated responsibilities. All requisite testing is performed by the Scrum Team.

    4. Not necessariliy. Each Sprint must yield an increment that is potentially releasable.

    5. This is a shared responsibility. The first person who sees it needs updating should do so.

    6/7. They discuss what they plan to do before the next standup. It's not a matter of how many hours you have left in your working day or what time zone you're in.
    Senthil
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:7
    Senthil

    --
    04 Sep 2013 05:56 PM
    Thanks Ian for a quick reply. That helps a lot!!!
    Senthil
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:7
    Senthil

    --
    06 Sep 2013 02:38 PM
    I've passed my PSM I exams today! Thanks!
    Leonhartsberger
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:4
    Leonhartsberger

    --
    06 Oct 2013 05:52 PM
    I, I have a doubt that I cannot find a proper answer:

    What is NOT a benefit of self-organization to the Scrum Development Team?
    -Increased feeling of accountability.
    - increased creativity.
    - increased commitment.
    - management can remove a failing resource more easily.

    I think the answer is the last one, but also it's a benefit as being self-organized, they can detect impediments and report the product owner to make the decision, right?
    Ian Mitchell
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Posts:562
    Ian Mitchell

    --
    06 Oct 2013 10:47 PM
    A Scrum Development team must control its own process, i.e. everything that is needed to bring their work to completion such that it meets the Definition of Done.

    This means that the ability to resolve the matter of a failing resource must also lie under their control. It is not a matter that should fall under the control of any other authority.
    Leonhartsberger
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:4
    Leonhartsberger

    --
    07 Oct 2013 05:39 PM
    Thanks Ian.
    RyanRipley
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:4
    RyanRipley

    --
    15 Oct 2013 10:09 AM

    Posted By Ian Mitchell on 06 Oct 2013 11:47 PM
    A Scrum Development team must control its own process, i.e. everything that is needed to bring their work to completion such that it meets the Definition of Done.

    This means that the ability to resolve the matter of a failing resource must also lie under their control. It is not a matter that should fall under the control of any other authority.


    Great point Ian, too add to it just a bit:

    This is probably one of the hardest concepts for a Scrum Master to accept - especially if he/she comes from a PMPish background where command and control are favored methods. Stepping back and respecting the authority of the team is CRITICAL to their ability to self-organize and to solve problems. Resisting the urge to solve the problems for the development team is something that I think most SM's will struggle with initially.

    If a Scrum Master insists on solving all of the problems all they do is coach the development team to be reliant on them. It's far better to ask probing questions and help guide the team to their own solutions.

    --Ryan Ripley
    Khurram Tahir
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:3
    Khurram Tahir

    --
    16 Dec 2013 09:55 AM
    then what is the answer of the question raised by Leonhartsberger
    Leonhartsberger
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:4
    Leonhartsberger

    --
    16 Dec 2013 10:08 AM
    The answer is "management can remove a failing resource more easily."

    Only Team should has the ability to change/remove any resource.
    You are not authorized to post a reply.


    Feedback